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Implantation Bleeding, Cramping and Other Early Pregnancy Signs

If you’re wondering whether or not you’re pregnant, there are several early signs you can look for that can give you clues as to whether or not a baby may be on the way. It is important to remember that every woman is different, and the symptoms that each of us can experience will vary from person to person. It is also very common to experience completely different symptoms from one pregnancy to the next.

Many symptoms, which follow he first 2-3 months after conception, are quite similar to the feelings a woman experiences before and during her menstrual period. For this reason, those signs often go undetected. Although the most reliable way to confirm pregnancy is to take a special blood test, it is important to be able to identify other early signs of the new condition. If you understand, how your body may respond to the process of conception, you will definitely notice all the symptoms. Read more.

If you’re wondering whether or not you’re pregnant, there are several early signs you can look for that can give you clues as to whether or not a baby may be on the way. It is important to remember that every woman is different, and the symptoms that each of us can experience will vary from person to person. It is also very common to experience completely different symptoms from one pregnancy to the next.

Many symptoms, which follow he first 2-3 months after conception, are quite similar to the feelings a woman experiences before and during her menstrual period. For this reason, those signs often go undetected. Although the most reliable way to confirm pregnancy is to take a special blood test, it is important to be able to identify other early signs of the new condition. If you understand, how your body may respond to the process of conception, you will definitely notice all the symptoms. Read more.

When Does Fertilization Occur?

So when does fertilization actually occur? We can divide the process of new life creation into three main phases:

  1. Ovulation.
  2. Fertilization.
  3. Implantation.

The entire process begins with a woman’s menstrual cycle, which is basically defined as numerous preparations the body goes through to get ready for fertilization. Roughly halfway through the menstrual cycle, ovulation occurs. The woman’s body releases an egg into the Fallopian tube. It is called an ovum. Ovulation is perhaps the most delicate part of the whole action, because in order for the egg to be fertilized, your body must release a lot of hormones and trigger a litany of different processes. Moreover, fertilization itself has the potential to happen only within a very narrow window of time.

Statistics depend on many factors, including first of all the age group, but in general a woman has about a 15-20% chance of getting pregnant in any one of normal menstrual cycles. Fertilization starts, when the sperm finally unites with the egg. Roughly 20 hours later the newly formed ball of cells (now called an “embryo” or “zygote”) begins to travel to the uterus. This journey takes approximately from 6 to 12 days to be completed. During this time the embryo continues to develop into what is scientifically called a “blastocyst.” Once it has arrived to the uterus, it attaches itself to the lining of the uterine wall. It is exactly what we know under the term “implantation process”. By this time, the blastocyst has developed into a more complex organism comprised of roughly 100 cells. A miracle, isn’t it?

What Does Implantation Bleeding Mean?

The process of implantation (also referred to as “trophoblast invasion”) causes a small level of localized trauma to the uterine wall, rupturing tiny blood vessels in the uterine lining. This creates an early pregnancy sign, known as implantation bleeding. Women, who have this symptom, will normally experience the light vaginal discharge (a.k.a. spotting) that is of a pinkish or sometimes brown color. If the discharge is brown, this means that the blood is older, and it may have taken a little longer for an embryo to travel from the uterus to the vagina. Not every woman, who gets pregnant, experiences implantation bleeding, and it is no cause for concern if you do; this condition does not actually indicate the viability of your pregnancy.

How to Distinguish Implantation and Regular Menstruation

Implantation bleeding typically appears around the same time that regular menstrual bleeding occurs. This fact can sometimes make it harder to determine, which one is actually happening. A key distinction to make is that menstrual blood will normally be more reddish, while the blood from implantation will stay light pink or brown. It should also be noted, that menstrual blood flow is significantly heavier, than implantation one, which typically looks more like light spotting along with cervical mucus discharge.

Timing is another factor to consider as well. If you notice spotting roughly one week after ovulation, this will more than likely be the result of implantation, but if spotting occurs very close to the time when your period normally starts, it may not be. Implantation bleeding may also be accompanied by other symptoms including light cramping in the lower abdomen and a slight increase in basal body temperature. This may be due to the body taking measures to adapt to the newly implanted embryo. Light cramping is quite normal, but if you are experiencing very strong or painful spasms, it may be a sign of a more significant problem.

Other Early Signs of Pregnancy

While the symptoms can greatly vary from person to person, we can define such several most common early signs of pregnancy as:

1. Fatigue.

For many women the first trimester can bring a lot of different surprises. One of them – endless fatigue. Wherever you are the only thing you want after your dinner is to take a midday nap. This is due to the increased levels of the hormone progesterone being released into your body. The second trimester, fortunately, normally comes with an increase in energy, but by the third trimester you can expect fatigue to creep back into the picture. Take extra naps and go to bed earlier whenever you can. Don’t exhaust yourself.

2. Tender breasts.

Many women experience breast tenderness when they’re expecting. Your breasts may also feel heavier or fuller than usual, and the area right around your nipple (a.k.a. the areola) may become darker or larger. Heavier or swollen breasts are often the result of the water retention increase, which usually happens during pregnancy, as well as an increase in progesterone. It will be very helpful to wear a supportive bra during your term.

3. Lightheadedness or dizziness.

Many women experience lightheadedness during the early stages of pregnancy. This can be due to changes in hormone levels or a drop in blood pressure. It may be worth visiting your OB to pinpoint the issue. For many women, the “spaced out” feeling decreases significantly after the first trimester.

4. Nausea or vomiting.

The classic symptom known as “morning sickness” is not always limited to morning time; nausea and vomiting can actually happen at any time during the day when you’re pregnant. Do your best to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water, and try to eat small portions of protein-rich foods several times throughout the day.

5. Mood swings.

Mood swings appear due to hormonal changes. The emotions become stronger during pregnancy, tearfulness appears. Many women also experience additional stress, often revolving around the uncertainty that comes along with becoming a parent. Emotional responses to other factors such as hunger or fatigue can be augmented due to mood swings as well.

It is important not to forget to be patient with yourself during the entire process of conception. Your body is going through a myriad of physical and hormonal changes, which can sometimes make the entire process seem completely overwhelming. The detailed information above and our other articles will definitely help you to notice the first pregnancy signs and to behave during your term properly.

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