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Cervical Mucus During and After Ovulation. Ovulation Symptoms

Cervical mucus is produced by the mucous glands of the uterine cervix and the intensity of secretion depends on the certain period of the menstrual cycle (MC). During ovulation, cervical mucus is almost fluid and is secreted in great amount. It stretches well and creates an excellent nutritive environment for the sperm cells. The form of cervical mucus, as well as other ovulation symptoms, can be identified both at home and in a laboratory.

Cervical mucus is an important secrete, produced by the mucous glands of the uterine cervix. Its secretion has a cyclic nature. We distinguish between six stages of cervical mucus secretion:

  1. Dry days;
  2. Thick, sticky discharge;
  3. Cream-like mucus;
  4. Profuse watery discharge;
  5. Ovulation cervical mucus, resembling an egg white;
  6. Thick «progesterone-type» discharge.

Presented in a form of a diagram, this list allows to trace the estrogen influence over the MC. In phases 1-2 estrogen level is extremely low, in stages 3-4 it starts rising, and the chances of impregnation also increase. Stage 5, the peak of estrogen prevalence, provokes emergence of the ovum. And finally, in the 6th phase, the notional curve goes down, since estrogen concedes its place to another equally vital hormone – progesterone.

Consequently, the typical sticky structure of the fluid and almost transparent cervical mucus during ovulation is the result of estrogen influence.

Cervical mucus is produced by the mucous glands of the uterine cervix and the intensity of secretion depends on the certain period of the menstrual cycle (MC). During ovulation, cervical mucus is almost fluid and is secreted in great amount. It stretches well and creates an excellent nutritive environment for the sperm cells. The form of cervical mucus, as well as other ovulation symptoms, can be identified both at home and in a laboratory.

Cervical mucus is an important secrete, produced by the mucous glands of the uterine cervix. Its secretion has a cyclic nature. We distinguish between six stages of cervical mucus secretion:

  1. Dry days;
  2. Thick, sticky discharge;
  3. Cream-like mucus;
  4. Profuse watery discharge;
  5. Ovulation cervical mucus, resembling an egg white;
  6. Thick «progesterone-type» discharge.

Presented in a form of a diagram, this list allows to trace the estrogen influence over the MC. In phases 1-2 estrogen level is extremely low, in stages 3-4 it starts rising, and the chances of impregnation also increase. Stage 5, the peak of estrogen prevalence, provokes emergence of the ovum. And finally, in the 6th phase, the notional curve goes down, since estrogen concedes its place to another equally vital hormone – progesterone.

Consequently, the typical sticky structure of the fluid and almost transparent cervical mucus during ovulation is the result of estrogen influence.

Functions and features of egg white type mucus

Throughout the whole MC cervical mucus performs protective function, mechanically preventing the penetration of infectious agents into the uterine cavity. Before and during ovulation cervical mucus performs another major function – creation of beneficial conditions for the ovum to get together with the sperm cell.

The soft and fluid consistency of mucus contributes to this encounter, since the male sex cells can easily travel through it. In addition, in case the sperm cells appear in the cervix a few days prior to ovulation, the nutritive substances, which are contained in the discharge, will help them survive until the emergence of the ovum from the follicle.

Nevertheless, cervical mucus may not only help the sperm cells in reaching the destination, but also make a stand against their penetration into the cervical cavity. This refers to weak sperm cells, who cannot overcome the cross flow of cervical discharge. Thus, the primary natural selection is realized on a cellular level.

Too little amount of cervical mucus during ovulation or modification of its content can constitute the cervical factor of infertility. Here are some pathologies related to this phenomenon:

  • Immunologic incompatibility – This is the case when antispermal antibodies are detected in the mucus;
  • Cervical stenosis (as a consequence of cicatrical changes of the cervix or adhesions after surgical intervention, including abortion) – the discharge is not produced in sufficient amount due to the affection of mucous glands;
  • Diabetes mellitus – biochemical composition of mucus does not conform with norms.

Tests for the calculation of ovulation according to cervical mucus

The stages of cervical mucus production can be monitored even at home, by maintaining a special record book.   It is necessary to consecutively register the days of menstruation (marking them with letter “M”), dry days (“D”), thick non-transparent mucus “N”, cream-like discharge (“C”), followed by fluid secrete (“F”), egg white type of mucus (“E”) and finally, thick, progesterone type of mucus (“P”).

It is required to abstain from sexual life during the first month of maintaining such a record book. Periods “C”, “F” and “E” are most favorable for conceiving, since the peak of profuse discharge usually foreshadows ovulation. This method has only 70% accuracy, therefore it cannot serve the only waymark for the woman.

Clinical tests include:

  • Detection of “pupil” symptom;
  • Testsonstretching;
  • The “frond” test.

Gynecological examination of the uterine cervix can reveal the presence of significant expansion of the external cervical mouth due to massive discharge of ovulation cervical mucus. This phenomenon is referred to as “pupil” symptom.

The second test can be performed by a doctor or by the patient herself at home. To do this, it is required to use a clean finger to take out from the vagina a little amount of mucus, place it on the palm of your second hand and stretch the “mucous thread”. Its length can reach up to 12cm during ovulation, while on other days of the cycle strings of mucus break even between two parted fingers.

The “frond” picture can be observed if the mucus, which has dried up on the glass slide, is examined under the microscope. This effect is associated with high acid content in estrogen discharge. The progesterone-influenced mucus crystallizes fragmentarily and thus, it does not create such a picture.

Symptoms of ovulation, that are not related to cervical mucus

The following phenomena can be indicative of the emergence of ovum from the follicle.

  • Ovulation bleeding – slight spotting in the middle of the cycle;
  • Tingling, not so intensive abdominal pain, caused by the ovulating ovary;
  • Basal temperature peak index on the diagram, if applicable;
  • Positive result of a special test (can be purchases in a drug store).

Thus, ovulation is possible to be traced, monitoring the cervical mucus, as well as via other methods. It is important to keep in mind that disturbance of phases of cervical mucus production before and after ovulation, as well as changes in its coloring, smell and consistency testify to the presence of a pathology. Such symptoms by all means require clinical diagnostics.

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